Lux, Art, & Veritas

yale + art / art + yale fan club
robrocke:

2 May 2014 on Flickr.

Rob Rocke, Masters in Philosophy from Yale 1996
“Before seriously pursuing photography, Rob Rocke was working on a Ph.D. in Music Theory at Yale University. While at Yale, he studied black and white darkroom photography with Harold Shapiro at the Creative Arts Workshop in New Haven and color darkroom photography with David Hilliard at Yale.” (Artist Bio - Library Science, 2011) 

robrocke:

2 May 2014 on Flickr.

Rob Rocke, Masters in Philosophy from Yale 1996

“Before seriously pursuing photography, Rob Rocke was working on a Ph.D. in Music Theory at Yale University. While at Yale, he studied black and white darkroom photography with Harold Shapiro at the Creative Arts Workshop in New Haven and color darkroom photography with David Hilliard at Yale.” (Artist Bio - Library Science, 2011) 

humanslikeme:

John Currin - Thanksgiving, 2003 [1179x1536]

John Currin, Yale MFA in Painting 1986; visiting artist at Yale, 2011

“At Yale, you became close friends with artists Lisa Yuskavage and Sean Landers. How did their successes, and failures, affect you?
The core gang was always Richard [Phillips], Sean, and Lisa. With Sean, our work was stylistically very different. He made these drawings, fictional letters to his loan officer on yellow legal pads—they’re really weird, and I always loved them. It inspired me, because I was trying to find my style. Sean hit on something that was his alone earlier than I did.” (New York Magazine, 2007) 

humanslikeme:

John Currin - Thanksgiving, 2003 [1179x1536]

John Currin, Yale MFA in Painting 1986; visiting artist at Yale, 2011

At Yale, you became close friends with artists Lisa Yuskavage and Sean Landers. How did their successes, and failures, affect you?

The core gang was always Richard [Phillips], Sean, and Lisa. With Sean, our work was stylistically very different. He made these drawings, fictional letters to his loan officer on yellow legal pads—they’re really weird, and I always loved them. It inspired me, because I was trying to find my style. Sean hit on something that was his alone earlier than I did.” (New York Magazine, 2007) 

prattphotoleague:

vicemag:

I hope the photographs provoke people to ask questions:  What kinds of jobs allow people to live in the contemporary American West? How should we use the wild land we have left? 

Don’t miss his artist lecture at Pratt Institute on November 12th in Higgins Hall!

Lucas Foglia, Yale MFA in Photography 2010

Daniel Shea: Yale is frequently mystified and enlarged by the rest of the art/photo world and prospective MFA students. It’s a thing of its own. And the reality might be different than that. How was your experience in the program?

Lucas Foglia: It’s surprising that it is so frequently mystified… I know that it is statistically hard to get into as a graduate student, but anyone can go to any critique and listen. Before I applied, I visited some critiques, so I knew what I was getting into. Different photographers and curators are invited to the critiques but when I was there Tod Papageorge ran the show. And Tod’s photographic references were consistent: John Szarkowski, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand. Each graduate student showed work every 5 weeks. The panel of critics sat behind a table. The photographs were pinned on the wall, and the graduate student sat in a chair in the middle of the room, facing the panel, with an audience behind him or her. There were some classes each semester, but there were no real obligations besides having to produce work for the critiques.” (Flak Photo Interview, 2012)

Brennan Gerard of Gerard & Kelly (collaboration with Ryan Kelly), Yale BA in Theatre and Women’s & Gender Studies 2001

Gerard & KellyMaster/Slave, 2012. Clocks, plinth, plexiglass, 48 x 48 x 16 inches

“For the past three years and through a series of performances, videos, and installations, Gerard & Kelly have investigated the couple as the paradigmatic sign of intimacy. They have brought a queer perspective on gender and sexuality to this artistic research, setting up choreographic procedures for manifesting unimagined intimate relations beyond the normative model of enduring, monogamous coupledom.” (Artist Statement)

hijaktaffairs:

karla wozniak56 south, TN, 2011. Oil on panel, 24 x 26 in.

Karla Wozniak, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2005
“As far as sensory overload is concerned I have always been a maximalist. I throw the kitchen sink into my work and flounder around till the pieces achieve some sort of coherent organization and voice. My paintings go from being just crazy to an orchestrated blast of information that is overwhelming but ultimately synthesizes into a precarious whole. I think that’s how we have to deal with our world these days. Images overwhelm us on the road or on the computer, so much so that we tune much of it out. I feel like these paintings are about me both acknowledging and taming the overwhelming stimuli I experience daily.” (Modern Ink Mag Interview, 2012)

hijaktaffairs:

karla wozniak
56 south, TN, 2011. Oil on panel, 24 x 26 in.

Karla Wozniak, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2005

“As far as sensory overload is concerned I have always been a maximalist. I throw the kitchen sink into my work and flounder around till the pieces achieve some sort of coherent organization and voice. My paintings go from being just crazy to an orchestrated blast of information that is overwhelming but ultimately synthesizes into a precarious whole. I think that’s how we have to deal with our world these days. Images overwhelm us on the road or on the computer, so much so that we tune much of it out. I feel like these paintings are about me both acknowledging and taming the overwhelming stimuli I experience daily.” (Modern Ink Mag Interview, 2012)

Elizaveta (Leeza) Meksin, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2007
House Coat, 2011. Cosign Projects, St. Louis, MO

“HOUSE COAT, is a site-specific installation in St. Louis, MO, that involves the creation of a fitted spandex garment for a two-story building, which houses Cosign Projects, an exterior gallery run by Lauren Adams and Jake Peterson.HOUSE COAT, as the pun implies, refers both to the literal fact of the house getting a new covering (a face lift of sorts) as well as to the garment often worn by people indoors (i.e. the outfit that is specifically designed for a private sphere and not permitted an exterior use)…

I’m interested in exploring questions such as: (1) How does the life expectancy of a building material (i.e. brick or wood) affect our perceptions of durability, solidity, and hardiness; (2) What happens to large inanimate objects when they get dressed up in architectural drag; (3) How do pattern and decoration relate to questions of gender and sexuality?” (Artist Statement)

Hanneline Røgeberg, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 1990; lecturer in Painting, Yale School of Art, 1991-1993; visiting artist at Yale, 1997
Portrait Sheikh II, 2009. Oil on canvas, 12 x 10 in. 
“The published image of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed upon his capture in 2003 went viral as visual shorthand for the enemy as all that was abject, hairy and debased. In the rhetoric of the War on Terror, the image was universal. I congratulated myself on being fluent in it, and had a conflicting animal urge at the same time- somebody ought to lick his fur down.                                                                                                                                                                                                              The brush is a tongue.
In these paintings I accept the inadequacy of any system of representation to presume truth, and dig for below-human-register frequencies and overlaps in the unequal but complementary rhetoric of the two portraits of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed.” (Artist’s Statement)

Hanneline Røgeberg, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 1990; lecturer in Painting, Yale School of Art, 1991-1993; visiting artist at Yale, 1997

Portrait Sheikh II, 2009. Oil on canvas, 12 x 10 in. 

“The published image of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed upon his capture in 2003 went viral as visual shorthand for the enemy as all that was abject, hairy and debased. In the rhetoric of the War on Terror, the image was universal. I congratulated myself on being fluent in it, and had a conflicting animal urge at the same time- somebody ought to lick his fur down.                                                                                                                                                                                                              The brush is a tongue.

In these paintings I accept the inadequacy of any system of representation to presume truth, and dig for below-human-register frequencies and overlaps in the unequal but complementary rhetoric of the two portraits of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed.” (Artist’s Statement)

Mike Cloud, MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2003Rainbow Rabbit Quilt, 2008, Oil on clothing with stretcher bars, 70 x 56 inches 
“The unconscious part of me, or the childish part of me has things it wants to do—I’ve always wanted to make a painting about fractals, or I wanted to make a painting about Georgia O’Keeffe, or I wanted to make a painting about holidays—my heart wants those things. The part of me that is a professional artist tells that other part of me if the idea will work in a particular painting. When I find the painting that’s the right shape, or I find some color relationship that will facilitate a Halloween painting, I’ll make it…” (“Dying Merging Multitasking: An Interview with Mike Cloud by Karla Wozniak,” Temporary Art Review, 2013)

Mike Cloud, MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2003
Rainbow Rabbit Quilt, 2008, Oil on clothing with stretcher bars, 70 x 56 inches 

“The unconscious part of me, or the childish part of me has things it wants to do—I’ve always wanted to make a painting about fractals, or I wanted to make a painting about Georgia O’Keeffe, or I wanted to make a painting about holidays—my heart wants those things. The part of me that is a professional artist tells that other part of me if the idea will work in a particular painting. When I find the painting that’s the right shape, or I find some color relationship that will facilitate a Halloween painting, I’ll make it…” (“Dying Merging Multitasking: An Interview with Mike Cloud by Karla Wozniak,” Temporary Art Review, 2013)

Angela Dufresne, Critic at the Yale School of Art, 2012Listen to Me You Idiot, 2014, oil on canvas, 20 x 16 inches@John Davis Gallery, August 17-Sept 7, 2014
"I’m an absolute, belligerent lover of painting, but I’m equally influenced by the Pictures Generation. I grew up looking at Richard Prince just as much as I was looking at Caravaggio at the same time, so there’s no way that can’t be an active part of my work. I’m not really the type of person to crawl into a cave and paint still life…it’s just not my way. That’s something that…I think that’s where I struggle and I succeed with the cinema reference, and reference in general, because I use it a lot." (New American Painting Interview, 2012)

Angela Dufresne, Critic at the Yale School of Art, 2012
Listen to Me You Idiot,
2014, oil on canvas, 20 x 16 inches
@John Davis Gallery, August 17-Sept 7, 2014

"I’m an absolute, belligerent lover of painting, but I’m equally influenced by the Pictures Generation. I grew up looking at Richard Prince just as much as I was looking at Caravaggio at the same time, so there’s no way that can’t be an active part of my work. I’m not really the type of person to crawl into a cave and paint still life…it’s just not my way. That’s something that…I think that’s where I struggle and I succeed with the cinema reference, and reference in general, because I use it a lot." (New American Painting Interview, 2012)

hyperallergic:

Mark Tobey, “White Night” (1942), tempera on paperboard mounted on composition board, 22 ¼ x 14 in., Seattle Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Berthe Poncy Jacobson, 32.78. (© Seattle Art Museum, Photo: Paul Macapia.​​​​​​​​​​) (via Northwest Passages: Into the Modernist Mystic)

Mark Tobey, visiting critic in Painting at Yale in 1951 (invited by Josef Albers)
“Tobey’s distinctive approach to painting came to be called ‘white writing’—an obsessive, dense, calligraphic style that seems akin to ancient symbolic expression, like characters scratched into the surfaces of black obsidian or clay tablets. Tobey’s white lines on dark surfaces perfectly convey forces that are familiar to us all—like meteor showers in the night sky, for example—and that we appreciate as some of the most ravishing and mysterious occurrences in nature.” (Seattle Art Museum)

hyperallergic:

Mark Tobey, “White Night” (1942), tempera on paperboard mounted on composition board, 22 ¼ x 14 in., Seattle Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Berthe Poncy Jacobson, 32.78. (© Seattle Art Museum, Photo: Paul Macapia.​​​​​​​​​​) (via Northwest Passages: Into the Modernist Mystic)

Mark Tobey, visiting critic in Painting at Yale in 1951 (invited by Josef Albers)

“Tobey’s distinctive approach to painting came to be called ‘white writing’—an obsessive, dense, calligraphic style that seems akin to ancient symbolic expression, like characters scratched into the surfaces of black obsidian or clay tablets. Tobey’s white lines on dark surfaces perfectly convey forces that are familiar to us all—like meteor showers in the night sky, for example—and that we appreciate as some of the most ravishing and mysterious occurrences in nature.” (Seattle Art Museum)