Henry Chapman (Yale MFA in Painting expected 2015)Contemplation Space
“In late 2011, I began to unearth the ways my painting practice had been impacted and provoked by disasters I was witness to, as a teenager in Manhattan on 9-11-01 and as a volunteer on the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina. Reading T.J. Clark’s “The Sight of Death,” I saw his diaristic account of two Poussin paintings as a response to disaster. His sustained attention to the experience of these art objects resisted the sensationalism after 9-11-01. I felt his writing helped reveal to me my personal and artistic need to address questions of mortality in my work.” (Artist Statement)
I came across Chapman’s work on a great contemporary art blog called Young Space, which seems to be undertaken in much the same spirit as this site. When I was selecting a piece of work to show here, I was struck by the violence in so much of Chapman’s work. But finding Chapman’s artist statement, and reading through his reflections on the content of his disaster paintings—particularly the work dealing with 9/11— provided me with a different perspective on his work. I do think art needs to push against discomfort, so I am glad he is pursing this thread in his practice. 

Henry Chapman (Yale MFA in Painting expected 2015)
Contemplation Space

“In late 2011, I began to unearth the ways my painting practice had been impacted and provoked by disasters I was witness to, as a teenager in Manhattan on 9-11-01 and as a volunteer on the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina. Reading T.J. Clark’s “The Sight of Death,” I saw his diaristic account of two Poussin paintings as a response to disaster. His sustained attention to the experience of these art objects resisted the sensationalism after 9-11-01. I felt his writing helped reveal to me my personal and artistic need to address questions of mortality in my work.” (Artist Statement)

I came across Chapman’s work on a great contemporary art blog called Young Space, which seems to be undertaken in much the same spirit as this site. When I was selecting a piece of work to show here, I was struck by the violence in so much of Chapman’s work. But finding Chapman’s artist statement, and reading through his reflections on the content of his disaster paintings—particularly the work dealing with 9/11— provided me with a different perspective on his work. I do think art needs to push against discomfort, so I am glad he is pursing this thread in his practice. 

Justine Kurland, Yale MFA in Photography 1998
“To photograph this series, Kurland drove across the country while living in a van with her one-year old son. She began in New York City and made her way across the southern U.S. toward the Pacific Northwest. She stopped at some 45 locations, including national parks, beaches and campgrounds, to take photographs of other mothers and children that she met along the way. The exhibition’s title is taken from an essay by Adrienne Rich about the realities of motherhood. Kurland uses the natural landscape as a stage for these photographs, constructing an optimistic fantasy about living in harmony with nature and finding faith in humankind, even as the world becomes increasingly unsettling.” (Mitchell-Innes & Nash)

Justine Kurland, Yale MFA in Photography 1998

“To photograph this series, Kurland drove across the country while living in a van with her one-year old son. She began in New York City and made her way across the southern U.S. toward the Pacific Northwest. She stopped at some 45 locations, including national parks, beaches and campgrounds, to take photographs of other mothers and children that she met along the way. The exhibition’s title is taken from an essay by Adrienne Rich about the realities of motherhood. Kurland uses the natural landscape as a stage for these photographs, constructing an optimistic fantasy about living in harmony with nature and finding faith in humankind, even as the world becomes increasingly unsettling.” (Mitchell-Innes & Nash)

passaxpassa:

Njideka Akunyili | The Beautiful Ones #1b [alternative take] & Nwantinti [along two details], both 2012.

"It was a layering of multiple interests. Obviously my love for Nigeria where I was born, my love for my life here, my love for my husband.. and just try to figure out a way the two kinda exist in a harmonious way.”

"I think of my work as capturing the very ordinary. Just normal.. everyday stuff. I think there is something beautiful and powerful in the things that happen daily. Intimate situations.. sensual situations.. these [situations] people don’t get to see. I think there is a beauty in that I’m very attracted to.. that I try to get out.”

@ Studio Museum’s Artists-in-Residence talk on youtube.

Don’t forget to visit her website for more.

Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Yale MFA in Painting 2011

“While avoiding confessional intimacies, [Akunyili Crosby] manages simultaneously to tell her story and to sketch a larger picture of emigration, dislocation and what she has called the “contradictory loyalties” in her love for Nigeria and her appreciation of Western culture.” (Vita.MN)

photographsonthebrain:

la-beaute—de-pandore:

Mickalene Thomas, Afro Goddess with Hands Between Legs, 2006,


Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009
“Mickalene Thomas’s chocolate-colored sisters with statuesque thighs, supple flesh, and meandering hair announce the promise of womanist agency. The space-age domestics or mother Africa soul searchers of her odalisque photos are draped over sofas and swathed in layers of contrasting “exotic” prints—a porn trope as much as it was a fact of ’70s interior design. Thomas’s bodies begin as substrata, canvases to a libidinal urge reminiscent of depictions of the Other in early photography and pornography (and, in turn, historical photographs’ mimicry of Western painting traditions). But, while relying on the familiar arrangements of white-male painting tradition, Thomas allows her photographic compositions to spiral inward, away from the superficial tropes of exotica, toward the complex sexuality of her models. Situated in a wood-paneled setting redolent of a recreation room or a now-dated interior redesign—familiar to a child of the ’70s like Thomas—each photograph layers pride and resistance. A formerly exploitative gaze—Manet’s Olympia, Matisse’s odalisques—becomes the frame for a kind of post-womanist self-consciousness.” (Kara Walker for BOMB Magazine)

photographsonthebrain:

la-beaute—de-pandore:

Mickalene Thomas, Afro Goddess with Hands Between Legs, 2006,

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009

“Mickalene Thomas’s chocolate-colored sisters with statuesque thighs, supple flesh, and meandering hair announce the promise of womanist agency. The space-age domestics or mother Africa soul searchers of her odalisque photos are draped over sofas and swathed in layers of contrasting “exotic” prints—a porn trope as much as it was a fact of ’70s interior design. Thomas’s bodies begin as substrata, canvases to a libidinal urge reminiscent of depictions of the Other in early photography and pornography (and, in turn, historical photographs’ mimicry of Western painting traditions). But, while relying on the familiar arrangements of white-male painting tradition, Thomas allows her photographic compositions to spiral inward, away from the superficial tropes of exotica, toward the complex sexuality of her models. Situated in a wood-paneled setting redolent of a recreation room or a now-dated interior redesign—familiar to a child of the ’70s like Thomas—each photograph layers pride and resistance. A formerly exploitative gaze—Manet’s Olympia, Matisse’s odalisques—becomes the frame for a kind of post-womanist self-consciousness.” (Kara Walker for BOMB Magazine)

commeunlion:

George Awde, Yale MFA in Photography 2009

“Chances are you have seen the work of George Awde around some­where before. Part of a Lebanese fam­ily, Awde (1980) was born and raised in the US. After grad­u­at­ing from Yale he has already exhib­ited widely, and is cur­rently a vis­it­ing [Fulbright] fel­low in Cairo. His style of work I would men­tally file under “con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can doc­u­men­tary pho­tog­ra­phy, shot with avail­able light and a nat­u­ral­is­tic color range”. Why do I men­tion it? Because there are few pho­tog­ra­phers born, raised and edu­cated in the Mid­dle East who bring this kind of aes­thet­ics to his sub­ject: “homo-social spaces” in the Lev­ant that “act as an out­let for male bond­ing and love, con­vey­ing a sense of belong­ing, move­ment, and hope — both across national bor­ders and social ones”.” (Mrs. Deane Dreaming)

commeunlion:

George Awde, Yale MFA in Photography 2009

“Chances are you have seen the work of George Awde around some­where before. Part of a Lebanese fam­ily, Awde (1980) was born and raised in the US. After grad­u­at­ing from Yale he has already exhib­ited widely, and is cur­rently a vis­it­ing [Fulbright] fel­low in Cairo. His style of work I would men­tally file under “con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can doc­u­men­tary pho­tog­ra­phy, shot with avail­able light and a nat­u­ral­is­tic color range”. Why do I men­tion it? Because there are few pho­tog­ra­phers born, raised and edu­cated in the Mid­dle East who bring this kind of aes­thet­ics to his sub­ject: “homo-social spaces” in the Lev­ant that “act as an out­let for male bond­ing and love, con­vey­ing a sense of belong­ing, move­ment, and hope — both across national bor­ders and social ones”.” (Mrs. Deane Dreaming)

adokal:

Lady in a Drawing Room, 1740-41, by Arthur Devis. Yale Center for British Art - New Haven, Connecticut USA.source

Devis was an 18th century British portrait painter. This oil painting, held by the Yale Center for British Art, is from rather early in his career, when he was 28 or 29, before he had established his studio on Great Queen Street in London and solidified his reputation. His work later fell from fashion, but this lady survived. She’s namelessly stared back at those who encountered her for the past two hundred and fifty years.

adokal:

Lady in a Drawing Room, 1740-41, by Arthur Devis. Yale Center for British Art - New Haven, Connecticut USA.
source

Devis was an 18th century British portrait painter. This oil painting, held by the Yale Center for British Art, is from rather early in his career, when he was 28 or 29, before he had established his studio on Great Queen Street in London and solidified his reputation. His work later fell from fashion, but this lady survived. She’s namelessly stared back at those who encountered her for the past two hundred and fifty years.

lehmannmaupin:

Throwback Thursday: Installation view of Bloom Projects: Mickalene Thomas at the MCA Santa Barbara, formerly the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum, in 2008.

Don’t miss Mickalene Thomas's Tete dê Femme, a new body of work currently on view at 540 W 26th Street.

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting / Printmaking 2002; 
appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009

birdflippin:

Eastern Eve (2009-14). Sasha Rudensky
http://www.sasharudensky.com/index.html

Sasha Rudensky, Yale MFA in Photography 2008

“To be a photographer means that your work becomes you. It’s not just something that you do from nine to six. It’s your ever-presence within the constant process. From the side it looks romantic and cool — you travel, doing your favorite thing. But the moments when this blissful feeling takes over you are rare. Most of the time what you feel is fear and doubt — regardless of your level of advancement as a photographer. Even the very process of photography comes with a certain dose of agony, and the only way to get out of its clutches is to achieve the result you are after.” (SR Interview @ Bird in Flight)

yaleuniversity:

The Yale Center for British Art is preparing for the second phase of the interior conservation of its landmark building, designed by Louis I. Kahn (1901–1974).
While the Center undergoes this transformation, works from the collection will be on view, across the street, at the Yale University Art Gallery. 

yaleuniversity:

The Yale Center for British Art is preparing for the second phase of the interior conservation of its landmark building, designed by Louis I. Kahn (1901–1974).

While the Center undergoes this transformation, works from the collection will be on view, across the street, at the Yale University Art Gallery