Sarah Faux (MFA expected 2015)

“A big surprise about school is just how differently a class of twenty painters can think about painting. There are practices in the painting department alone that range from narrative figuration to gestural abstraction, social/ political engagement to art-for-art’s-sake. It’s hard to pin down what the zeitgeist is here. Definitely liquidy, painterly painting in a room full of painters will usually please the crowd. But there are probably an equal number of conceptually driven painters in the program. And, of course, process work, video, installation—the whole gamut. We’ve had plenty of discussions about idea-driven, borderline-scientific art practices. And I’ve been surprised by new takes on the female body by women, embracing and tackling female sexuality head on. Engaging with work dissimilar to my own is thrilling. While pursuing my interest in specific modes of painting in New York, I didn’t realize how I’d closed myself off to others. My paintings may go through a bit of awkward phase now, but hopefully it’s one of opening back up, with condensation to come.” (Two Coats of Paint)

Robert Feintuch (MFA 1976)
Exhibition at Sonnabend Gallery in New York from May 3-July 25, 2014
(Image: Feet Up, Polymer emulsion on honeycomb panel, 23 3/4 x 19 inches, 2013)

Rail: What was your experience at Yale?

Feintuch: I learned a lot from Al Held and John Walker and from the other students. I learned a great deal about reductive painting that was coming out of Minimalism and geometric abstraction. I saw Al’s show at the Whitney in 1974. Those alphabet paintings from the ’60s really interested me a lot, particularly “The Yellow X” (1965) and “Mao” (1967). I was very much an abstract painter when I was at Yale, and the work became more and more reduced. Ed Rath, a painter friend, introduced me to Burgoyne Diller and Myron Stout’s work, and when I left my work was pretty influenced by both of them. One of the things I saw in Minimalist work was the way it makes you aware of your own body, how you feel things like symmetry versus asymmetry or verticality versus horizontality in your body, how all of those things have physical effects on viewers. Like I said, I learned a lot from my teachers but I had to get over them too. I knew there was stuff I was missing. I knew I wanted to do something else (…)

Rail: Even if I didn’t know that you had gone to graduate school at Yale, the following would suggest that you may have: One, your paintings are painted with full intention and thoughtfulness; two, they make use of structuralist language, as they are about mediating personal images that are driven to justify the balance between figuration and abstraction—I mean, there’s a serial tendency in the way that you perform the body with restraint, which was predominantly the idiom of the ’70s; three, they offer no apologies for referencing art historical sources, and bringing them into a personal discourse as well as a contemporary context.” (Brooklyn Rail Interview: Robert Feintuch in conversation with Phong Bui

letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009 letmypeopleshow:

The Eyes of Mickalene Thomas Speak Volumes

Mickalene Thomas, Yale MFA in Painting 2002; appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2009
greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myselfI have no otherransom money, nothing to break or barter but my lifemy spirit measured out, in bits, spread overthe roulette table, I recoup what I cannothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeunothing to thrust out the window, no white flagthis flesh all I have to offer, to make the play withthis immediate head, what it comes up with, my moveas we slither over this go board, stepping always(we hope) between the lines
— Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999
“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)
I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time.  greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myselfI have no otherransom money, nothing to break or barter but my lifemy spirit measured out, in bits, spread overthe roulette table, I recoup what I cannothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeunothing to thrust out the window, no white flagthis flesh all I have to offer, to make the play withthis immediate head, what it comes up with, my moveas we slither over this go board, stepping always(we hope) between the lines
— Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999
“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)
I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time.  greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myselfI have no otherransom money, nothing to break or barter but my lifemy spirit measured out, in bits, spread overthe roulette table, I recoup what I cannothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeunothing to thrust out the window, no white flagthis flesh all I have to offer, to make the play withthis immediate head, what it comes up with, my moveas we slither over this go board, stepping always(we hope) between the lines
— Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999
“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)
I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time.  greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myselfI have no otherransom money, nothing to break or barter but my lifemy spirit measured out, in bits, spread overthe roulette table, I recoup what I cannothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeunothing to thrust out the window, no white flagthis flesh all I have to offer, to make the play withthis immediate head, what it comes up with, my moveas we slither over this go board, stepping always(we hope) between the lines
— Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999
“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)
I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time.  greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myselfI have no otherransom money, nothing to break or barter but my lifemy spirit measured out, in bits, spread overthe roulette table, I recoup what I cannothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeunothing to thrust out the window, no white flagthis flesh all I have to offer, to make the play withthis immediate head, what it comes up with, my moveas we slither over this go board, stepping always(we hope) between the lines
— Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999
“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)
I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time. 

greatleapsideways:

I have just realized that the stakes are myself
I have no other
ransom money, nothing to break or barter but my life
my spirit measured out, in bits, spread over
the roulette table, I recoup what I can
nothing else to shove under the nose of the maitre de jeu
nothing to thrust out the window, no white flag
this flesh all I have to offer, to make the play with
this immediate head, what it comes up with, my move
as we slither over this go board, stepping always
(we hope) between the lines

Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letter #1” from Revolutionary Letters.

Photographs from The Ninety-Nine by Katy Grannan. More to follow…

Katy Grannan, Yale MFA in Photography 1999

“The 99 is the result of three years of work in the Central Valley, in which [Grannan] revisits the region of Dorothea Lange’s work in California during the Great Depression… In her intensely vivid color portraits, the artist works at midday when the sun is direct and the heat is unrelenting, presenting each individual, often simultaneously heroic and vulnerable, against stark, white backgrounds.” (Fraenkel Gallery)

I’ve posted Grannan’s work before. Her portraits get me every time. 

Rico Gatson, Yale MFA in Sculpture 1991

“Poignancy and peace take over in Rico Gatson’s single channel video installation When She Speaks (at Studio 10 from June 13-July 20, 2014). Engaging with voice and notions of resistance, the film contains original footage reworked from a Black Panther Party rally — the poignancy cutting in with the cadence in the main character’s voice and the peace entering as quiet respites for black spaces of contemplation. Accompanied by sculpture, painting and other selected works by Gatson, the exhibition takes on a kaleidoscopic layering between rhythmic footage and other elements within the studio.” (Bushwick Daily)

Katherine Turczan, Yale MFA in Photography 1990Images are from her series, From Where They Came (1990-2011)
“Katherine Turczan’s portraits from Ukraine describe a photographer’s response to a personal crisis and to a people in the midst of momentous historical change. Faced with the diagnosis of both parents with late stage dementia as a result of Alzheimer’s, Turczan set out in 1991 to photograph their homeland. Ironically, her arrival in Ukraine coincided with the August Coup in Moscow and its reverberations in other Socialist Republics. The painful transition from communism to capitalism, transforming the country and her own heritage, was a constantly developing mirror of her own personal transition in life. Turczan’s response to those transitions, depicted in the faces, postures, and returned glances of her sitters is an unforgettable meditation on the ways political and personal upheaval resolve themselves through individual lives.” (Essay) Katherine Turczan, Yale MFA in Photography 1990Images are from her series, From Where They Came (1990-2011)
“Katherine Turczan’s portraits from Ukraine describe a photographer’s response to a personal crisis and to a people in the midst of momentous historical change. Faced with the diagnosis of both parents with late stage dementia as a result of Alzheimer’s, Turczan set out in 1991 to photograph their homeland. Ironically, her arrival in Ukraine coincided with the August Coup in Moscow and its reverberations in other Socialist Republics. The painful transition from communism to capitalism, transforming the country and her own heritage, was a constantly developing mirror of her own personal transition in life. Turczan’s response to those transitions, depicted in the faces, postures, and returned glances of her sitters is an unforgettable meditation on the ways political and personal upheaval resolve themselves through individual lives.” (Essay)

Katherine Turczan, Yale MFA in Photography 1990
Images are from her series, From Where They Came (1990-2011)

“Katherine Turczan’s portraits from Ukraine describe a photographer’s response to a personal crisis and to a people in the midst of momentous historical change. Faced with the diagnosis of both parents with late stage dementia as a result of Alzheimer’s, Turczan set out in 1991 to photograph their homeland. Ironically, her arrival in Ukraine coincided with the August Coup in Moscow and its reverberations in other Socialist Republics. The painful transition from communism to capitalism, transforming the country and her own heritage, was a constantly developing mirror of her own personal transition in life. Turczan’s response to those transitions, depicted in the faces, postures, and returned glances of her sitters is an unforgettable meditation on the ways political and personal upheaval resolve themselves through individual lives.” (Essay)

Steve Giovinco, Yale MFA in Photography 1989
from the series On the Edge of Somewhere

“I focus on unguarded moments showing a couple eating, resting, talking, feeling bored, listless, being sexual, et cetera—living—to capture intimate psychological and emotional feelings between two people. I see what is in front of me, feel an emotional and visceral connection, and capture this in photographs. Documenting how people live their lives, my photographs trace the poetry and lyricism of daily life.” (—SG)

shevtcoff-sergo:

Diana Kirke, later Countess of Oxford, 1665 @

Peter Lely

(Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection)

Interestingly, a poster for the National Portrait Gallery’s Painted Ladies exhibition in 2001 used this portrait of Diana Kirke (which was part of the exhibition) and was subsequently banned by the London Underground because of the Kirke’s bare breast. Scandal!

“Lely was a Dutch painter who had moved to London in the 1640s. At first he worked on conventional lines, imitating van Dyck and William Dobson, then in the 1650s discovered his power to create a flattering image of femininity and, as art historian Ellis Waterhouse put it, “he never looked back”. After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, the artist became hugely fashionable, running a large studio and turning out portraits by the dozen.

He was in many ways a most accomplished painter, outstanding for example at drapery - which tended to take the form, as Horace Walpole put it, of a “fantastic night-gown, fastened with a single pin”. But he was an artist of a specific type: the closest modern parallel would be to a brilliant photographer such as Helmut Newton, whose images combine stylishness and sensuality with a degree of conformity - the conformity imposed by fashion.” (The Telegraph

blackcontemporaryart:

jordanmcasteel:

"Galen"

Yale MFA graduate Jordan Casteel’s Galen (2014) is an obvious standout. Her skills as a painter and familiarity with post-Impressionist artists Matisse and Cézanne are obvious in both her work’s unconventional colors as well as its composition.–Interview Magazine

Jordan Casteel, Yale MFA in Painting 2014