Lux, Art, & Veritas

yale + art / art + yale fan club
THIS THIS, acrylic on wood, 2014. 72” x 36” 
Jenna Pirello, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2013

THIS THIS, acrylic on wood, 2014. 72” x 36” 

Jenna Pirello, Yale MFA in Painting and Printmaking 2013

patrickfraserphotography:

Latest addition to the photography collection. II Legs by @erindesmond part of the #Yale MFA Photo 2014 on view until tomorrow @dianerosenstein gallery on Highland in LA. #legs #body #fineart

Erin Desmond, Yale MFA in Photography 2014
“The idea of unknown areas of possibility is an important theme for me, which I’m glad you can pick up on by drawing a connection to outer space. I like the idea of light fixtures as subjects, as well as metaphors for life forces, e.g. the sun. This is exactly what I want to happen—for my viewer to project their own idea onto a light source, or a body, or into a dark area. I think of the blackness in my photographs as spaces of mystery and potential—spaces that can be filled with matter that exists in the conscious and/or subconscious mind of the viewer.” (Don/Dean, 2012)

patrickfraserphotography:

Latest addition to the photography collection. II Legs by @erindesmond part of the #Yale MFA Photo 2014 on view until tomorrow @dianerosenstein gallery on Highland in LA. #legs #body #fineart

Erin Desmond, Yale MFA in Photography 2014

“The idea of unknown areas of possibility is an important theme for me, which I’m glad you can pick up on by drawing a connection to outer space. I like the idea of light fixtures as subjects, as well as metaphors for life forces, e.g. the sun. This is exactly what I want to happen—for my viewer to project their own idea onto a light source, or a body, or into a dark area. I think of the blackness in my photographs as spaces of mystery and potential—spaces that can be filled with matter that exists in the conscious and/or subconscious mind of the viewer.” (Don/Dean, 2012)

sweethesound:

Nest by Steve Budington (2009)

Steve Budington, Yale MFA in Photography and Printmaking 2004
“So I started looking at early anatomical studies from when (people) were essentially guessing about what was going on in the body, and then I look at accurate physiological forms such as the muscles here (in this painting), the kneecap, heart, skin, all of those things that we know about. But I’m obviously unwinding them, exposing them to the elements to open up some aspect of the embodied experience of the world. I think of these (painted figures) as really human beings having experiences. And in a sense they’ve been made strange in order for viewers to be able to think about those things in a way they wouldn’t from a normal representation of the body.” (University of Vermont Interview, 2008)

sweethesound:

Nest by Steve Budington (2009)

Steve Budington, Yale MFA in Photography and Printmaking 2004

“So I started looking at early anatomical studies from when (people) were essentially guessing about what was going on in the body, and then I look at accurate physiological forms such as the muscles here (in this painting), the kneecap, heart, skin, all of those things that we know about. But I’m obviously unwinding them, exposing them to the elements to open up some aspect of the embodied experience of the world. I think of these (painted figures) as really human beings having experiences. And in a sense they’ve been made strange in order for viewers to be able to think about those things in a way they wouldn’t from a normal representation of the body.” (University of Vermont Interview, 2008)

artblackafrica:

David HilliardBoys Tethered, 2008

David Hilliard, Yale MFA in Photography 1994; formerly an assistant professor at Yale University and director of Yale’s undergraduate photography department
“I’m very much interested in where the viewer is situated when they take in the work. I like the idea that this viewer has to work a bit to make associations between images (shifting focal planes and depth of field) and often physically move to take it all in. I love that in some of the large vertical images the viewer, along with the subject of the photo, are often sharing the same experience. Meaning that there could be an image of a person reclining, looking up into the sky and that the viewer also works to take in the same view.” (Landscapist, 2007)

artblackafrica:

David Hilliard
Boys Tethered, 2008

David Hilliard, Yale MFA in Photography 1994; formerly an assistant professor at Yale University and director of Yale’s undergraduate photography department

“I’m very much interested in where the viewer is situated when they take in the work. I like the idea that this viewer has to work a bit to make associations between images (shifting focal planes and depth of field) and often physically move to take it all in. I love that in some of the large vertical images the viewer, along with the subject of the photo, are often sharing the same experience. Meaning that there could be an image of a person reclining, looking up into the sky and that the viewer also works to take in the same view.” (Landscapist, 2007)

fashionsambapita:

Read each story here:http://vogue.cm/XSNWEq

Awol Erizku, Yale MFA in Photography 2014

These are GORGEOUS. Sorry to gush, but this came up on my dashboard and I started squealing straight off. These are beautiful portraits, bar none, and it’s super impressive to see Awol shooting for Vogue.com only a few months after graduating. Love this series— highly advise clicking through to see the entire set of 28 portraits from Brooklyn’s Afropunk Festival. 

“For the artist Awol Erizku, who captured the most striking [concert-goers]… with his camera for Vogue.com, the process of documenting their individual looks was about more than a good photograph. Instead, the lensman focused on illuminating the fractal symmetry of black hair and the sentiment attached to it. “I think [black hair] is beautiful because it can be shaped, shaved, cut, whatever. That’s what I was trying to find today—people who had that kind of hair and who embraced it and were proud of it.” (Vogue)

(via sothisisbabel)

gallowhill:

Matthew Barney, Cremaster video installation at New Museum, New York, 2013

Matthew Barney, Yale BA 1989
“Like Joseph Beuys and Byars, Barney creates stories and myths around every aspect of his work. Everything he does – drawing (he’s a marvellous draughtsman), sculpture (sometimes utilising frozen Vaseline and “self lubricating” plastics, just as Beuys used lumps of fat), film-making and performance – is interconnected: his own ragbag cosmology. ‘It’s never been the point to balance out these different mediums into a larger work,’ he says. ‘It’s just what is natural for me.’” (Guardian, 2014)

gallowhill:

Matthew Barney, Cremaster video installation at New Museum, New York, 2013

Matthew Barney, Yale BA 1989

“Like Joseph Beuys and Byars, Barney creates stories and myths around every aspect of his work. Everything he does – drawing (he’s a marvellous draughtsman), sculpture (sometimes utilising frozen Vaseline and “self lubricating” plastics, just as Beuys used lumps of fat), film-making and performance – is interconnected: his own ragbag cosmology. ‘It’s never been the point to balance out these different mediums into a larger work,’ he says. ‘It’s just what is natural for me.’” (Guardian, 2014)

(via nikkilipstick)

mpdrolet:

Shiprock, New Mexico, 2012 from The Rez
Lois Conner

Lois Conner, Yale MFA in Photography 1981; taught as faculty at Yale 1991-2000, 2002, 2004-5
This is part of a series of works that utilize multiple exposure to portray “The Rez.” The layering is, I think, a wonderful tool that exposes the layers of history and memory in place, as well as the impermanence of both. I think in some way it also explores the idea of the spirit world, or of walking between worlds. I wish I could find out more about the series— it’s not one that’s been talked about critically as far as I can tell. But I love it. It seems both spontaneous and carefully planned.

mpdrolet:

Shiprock, New Mexico, 2012 from The Rez

Lois Conner

Lois Conner, Yale MFA in Photography 1981; taught as faculty at Yale 1991-2000, 2002, 2004-5

This is part of a series of works that utilize multiple exposure to portray “The Rez.” The layering is, I think, a wonderful tool that exposes the layers of history and memory in place, as well as the impermanence of both. I think in some way it also explores the idea of the spirit world, or of walking between worlds. I wish I could find out more about the series— it’s not one that’s been talked about critically as far as I can tell. But I love it. It seems both spontaneous and carefully planned.

photographsonthebrain: 

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Mary and Babe, 1982
Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Yale MFA in Photography 1979; critic in photography at Yale at various times since 1996, currently senior critic.

D: Did you do your graduate studies at Yale?
dC: Yes, yes. And, that was quite a bit different. I think I was a bit of an anomaly at that point. They were still in a kind of rocks and ferns, Walker Evans, uh, black and white large format world then. And, Walker Evans had just died. They were in the process of a search for a replacement but his presence was still very strong there, which was not a problem for me… I mean, I totally respect him. But they didn’t have much tolerance for that kind of… at that time, I didn’t photograph people at all, and so, one shift that took place by going to graduate school was a move towards photographing people.
(American Suburb X Interview, 2003)

photographsonthebrain

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Mary and Babe, 1982

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Yale MFA in Photography 1979; critic in photography at Yale at various times since 1996, currently senior critic.

D: Did you do your graduate studies at Yale?

dC: Yes, yes. And, that was quite a bit different. I think I was a bit of an anomaly at that point. They were still in a kind of rocks and ferns, Walker Evans, uh, black and white large format world then. And, Walker Evans had just died. They were in the process of a search for a replacement but his presence was still very strong there, which was not a problem for me… I mean, I totally respect him. But they didn’t have much tolerance for that kind of… at that time, I didn’t photograph people at all, and so, one shift that took place by going to graduate school was a move towards photographing people.

(American Suburb X Interview, 2003)

(Source: moma.org)